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badge HeraldOn the first of October, Anno Societatis 51, in the Barony of Bergental, there was a Coronation. By the hands of King Kenric III and Queen Avelina III, Duchess Anna Ophelia Halloway Tarragon was crowned Queen Anna III. There was a brief pause in the Coronation ceremony as Brion sang “My Queen” to Queen Anna, bringing her – and several among the attending staff and audience – to joyful tears. Queen Anna then crowned Duke Brion Anthony Uriel Tarragon as King Brion III. They took the fealty of Their Great Officers of State, and of House Runnymede, and of Their Champions, and the people of the East and swore fealty to all of them in return. Rightfully crowned, they then called for Duke Kenric aet Essex, Duchess Avelina Keyes, and Lady Aethelthryth Kenricing and gave them gifts in return for the time they served the Kingdom. They then installed the Queen’s Guard and the Lords and Ladies in Waiting to their stations, before retiring to sit in State. Some little while later, the first Court of Their Majesties Brion III and Anna III was opened.

Duchess Rowan de la Garnison, Ambassador from Their Majesties Marcus and Marguerite of the Kingdom of AEthelmearc, was called before the Crown. She presented the words of Their Sylvan Majesties, words of friendship and unity, and gifts of the produce of their lands, cloth of their colours, and jewels. Duchess Rowan was warmly thanked for the gifts and instructed to bring Their Oriental Majesties’ own words of friendship back with her.

Their Majesties then called for the children of the East. King Brion spoke to the children, saying that if they wanted a toy from the chest, they must pursue scholarly deeds. He called for his Champion of Horse, Baroness Lillian Stanhope, and sent the children to follow her and learn something of horsemanship before each could take a toy.

Her Majesty then called for Duke Brennan mac Fearghus and thanked him for being a stalwart companion during Her time as Princess. She gifted him a bottle from the royal cellars as thanks for his guidance and friendship.

Queen Anna then called for Duchess Aikaterine FitzWilliam who, though not present, was thanked for the splendid Coronation garb she created for the Crown.

King Brion asked for Duke Gryffith, who was also absent, but thanked him for organising the Coronation tourney Their Majesties had requested.

Their Majesties then asked those newcomers to the Society to approach the throne and gave them handcrafted beads as tokens that they should remember the day.

Next the event stewards, Mistress Jovonne d’Esprit and Mistress Eleanore MacCarthaigh, were called before the Crown. They were thanked for the wonderful day they had organised and gifted bunches of roses as a thank you.

Master Julian le Scot was summoned by Queen Anna, who spoke of the fun times they had shared, the deep respect and admiration she had for him, and how Master Julian was someone who she wanted to emulate. She gifted him with a white glove and named him a Companion of the Queen’s Order of Courtesy.

Their Majesties called for Jehannette Bouchart. They spoke of her work as a tourney herald, as kitchen staff, and as a retainer for the Crown. Wishing to reward such works, They Awarded her Arms and made her a Lady of the Court. To commemorate this, Lady Jehannette was given a scroll created by Duchess Thora Eiriksdottir.

Drake MacGregor was brought before the thrones and Their Majesties praised him as a workhorse, quietly getting things done and striving to better himself. In recognition of his accomplishments, They Awarded him Arms, making him a Lord of the Court. A scroll by Baroness Mari Clock van Hoorne was presented to Lord Drake so that he would remember the day.

The Crown then asked for Lord Pádraig Ó Riain, who came forward. They spoke of the many years he had been involved in the Society, his time as Seneschal, his running of events and his work setting up and breaking down events for others. Wishing to recognise his many works, Pádraig was made a Companion of the Order of the Silver Wheel and given a scroll crafted by Heather Rose de Gordoun.

Celia le Taverner was summoned and Their Majesties spoke of her time attending previous Royals and her time spent braiding hair for others, and how she made others feel good about themselves. The King and Queen wished to reward such works and Awarded her Arms and gave the new Lady Celia a scroll with calligraphy and illumination by Lady Aesa Lokabrenna Sturludottir and words by Lord Arthur le Taverner.

King Brion then announced the winners of the tourney held that day. Duke Brennan mac Fearghus was called forward as the winner. He was presented a glass in recognition of his feat. His Majesty then called for Lord Corwin Blackthorn and praised his comportment in the lists and gave him a glass that he might remember his accomplishment.

Their Majesties then asked for Baron Simon Montgumery. That morning, Simon had been sent to vigil to contemplate whether he would accept the accolade of the Order of Chivalry. Simon knelt before the thrones and offered that he would be honoured to accept the belt of a Knight. Simon first returned his squire’s belt to his knight, then King Brion noted that he was very pleased to be the one to knight his great-grandsquire. Worthies from across the Known World came to speak on Simon’s behalf and, those words accepted, he was then girded with the spurs, belt, and chain of knighthood. Simon offered his oath of fealty. Their Majesties dubbed him Sir Simon Montgumery and King Brion gave him the last blow to be accepted unanswered. A scroll to commemorate the day, crafted and sealed by Pan Jan Janowicz Bogdanski was presented.

The business of the day finished, King Brion and Queen Anna thanked the people of Bergental and the people of the East for supporting Them and attending Their Coronation. On that note, Court was closed and Their Majesties processed out.

These are the events of the day as I recall them. My thanks to all the scribes, heralds, Champions, guards, retainers, event staff, and attendees for their help creating a wonderful day.

Pray know I remain,
For Crown and College,

 

Master Rowen Cloteworthy