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EASTERN RESULTS FROM THE MAY 2016 LoAR

The Society College of Heralds runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath Queen of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society. A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work. Most items are registered without comments. Sometimes, the LoAR will address specific issues about the name or armory or will praise the submitter/herald on putting together a very nice historically accurate item.

The following results are from the May 2016 Wreath and Pelican meetings.

EAST acceptances

Alys Mackyntoich. Heraldic will.

Upon her death, all items registered solely to Alys, including any registered after the issuance of this heraldic will, will be released.

In addition, the household name Sisterhood of Saint Walburga and its associated badge, (Fieldless) A standing seraph gules, haloed and charged with a cup held to its breast Or, will revert solely to Brunissende Dragonette.

An Dubhaigeainn, Barony. Badge. Per fess wavy azure and barry wavy argent and azure, a duck naiant contourny argent billed Or.

The submitter has permission to conflict with the device of Signý Ingadóttir: Per chevron ermine and purpure, in base a swan naiant contourny argent.

Antonii Machinevik. Name and device. Or, a wolf dormant contourny sable and a chief enarched vert.

 

Antonii Machinevik. Alternate name Kenny Lockin of Logan.

 

Arne Ulrichsson. Name and device. Per fess embattled gules and sable, three crosses fleury and an eagle Or.

Arne was documented in the Letter of Intent as a German given name, which is compatible with the Swedish last name under Appendix C of SENA.

The submitter may wish to know that Arne is found in Sweden dated from 1341 (SMP, s.n. Arne), so this name is also wholly Swedish.

Ayleth le Frye. Name.

Both elements are dated to 1332, making this an excellent 14th century English name!

Brynjolfr Rorikssen. Name and device. Quarterly argent and vert, a ram’s head cabossed quarterly sable and argent.

Rorik was documented as a possibly normalized Frisian given name, but no documentation to support the formation of the patronymic byname was provided in the Letter of Intent. The byname Rorikessone is found in the Diplomatarium Danicum, dated to 1411. Rørikssøn is found in the same source dated to 1401, in a text written in Old Danish. The patronymic ending -sen is found in this source, in an Old Danish text dated to 1401. Therefore, Rorikssen is a reasonable early 15th century Danish spelling.

The submitted form Brynjólfr is an earlier Old Norse form recorded in Iceland. The submitter may wish to know that the Danish form Bryniolff is documented to 1409 in Diplomatarium Danicum. If the submitter prefers this form of the name, he can submit a request for reconsideration.

Dragonship Haven, Barony of. Badge (see RETURNS for order name). (Fieldless) A woman passant contourny maintaining a drinking horn Or.

 

Dragonship Haven, Barony of. Order name Order of Saint Martin of Dragonship Haven and badge. Azure, on a sun argent a capital letter M azure.

Submitted as Order of Saint Martin, this order name conflicts with the registered branch name March of Saint Martin. We have added the branch name of Dragonship Haven is order to clear this conflict and register this name.

As the branch name was added, we decline to rule whether the submitted form presumed upon the island of Saint Martin (claimed for Spain by Columbus in 1493) or the 14th century Brotherhood of St. Martin founded by a cathedral in Utrecht, Netherlands.

Dragonship Haven, Barony of. Badge. (Fieldless) In saltire a pair of scissors and a smith’s hammer argent.

 

Dragonship Haven, Barony of. Badge for Order of the Keel. Per fess wavy azure and barry wavy argent and azure, a hulk Or and in chief two clouds argent.

Please advise the submitter to draw the ship larger, as befits a primary charge.

Gelleys Jaffrey. Device. Per bend sinister sable and azure, a bear statant erect contourny Or maintaining a glaive argent.

Johannes Mikkinen. Device. Quarterly azure and sable, four wolves rampant argent.

Nice device!

Kiena Stewart. Name reconsideration from Kiena Stiward.

 

Leifr Skáldason. Badge. Argent, a trebuchet vert and a chief embattled gules.

 

Lijsbet van Catwiic. Badge. Paly argent and purpure, a winged camelopard statant Or.

 

Lijsbet van Catwiic. Blanket permission to conflict with badge. Paly argent and purpure, a winged camelopard statant Or.

The submitter grants permission to conflict for any armory that is at least one countable step different from their registered armory.

Lottieri Malocchio. Badge. Per chevron sable and gules, a tower between three decrescents argent.

 

Lyssa ingen Fháeláin. Device. Vert, an owl displayed and in base a stringless hunting horn Or.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a bird other than an eagle in the displayed posture.

 

Magnus Thorfinnsson. Device. Per saltire arrondi azure and sable, two ravens respectant Or.

 

Marieta Charay. Device. Azure, a leaf Or and in base two mice sejant erect respectant argent, a bordure Or.

 

Nadia Hart. Name and device. Or, a badger rampant contourny sable marked argent maintaining a snake palewise vert, a bordure sable.

Both elements are dated to c.1600, making this a nice English name for the end of our period!

Niall Gorm. Name and device. Per bend argent and vert, a stag rampant contourny sable and a sword inverted argent.

Nice 15th century Gaelic name!

Niall Gorm. Badge. (Fieldless) On a stag rampant contourny argent a sword inverted sable.

 

Remy le Bastard. Device. Sable, a pall gules fimbriated between three crescents horns outward withina double tressure overall Or.

Please advise the submitter to draw the fimbriation and double tressure thicker.

Richard Holland. Device. Azure, in pale three lions passant gardant and on a chief Or three fleurs-de-lys azure.

Nice device!

Rúadán mac Paidín. Device. Per bend sinister gules and sable, a stag’s head cabossed and a broad-arrow argent.

 

Sabiha al-Nahdiya. Badge. Per pale wavy sable crusilly formy and argent semy of water bougets gules.

 

Tatiana Hopfen. Name.

Tatiana is the name of a 12th century Italian saint, known at least until the early 17th century.

This name combines an Italian saint’s name with a German byname. This is an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C of SENA.

Terren of Tir. Name.

Submitted as Terren of TIR (where TIR is an acronym), the name was changed in kingdom to Terren Tir with the submitter’s permission to use an attested byname.

Commenters were unable to document or construct the byname in the submitter’s preferred capitalization, so we could not restore the name to the submitted form.

The Latin phrase archiepiscopo de Tyr (“archbishop of Tyre”) is found in ‘The chronicle: 1187-1214’, Annales Cestrienses Chronicle of the Abbey of S. Werburg, At Chester (pp. 36-49, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/lancs-ches-record-soc/vol14/pp36-49), dated to 1188. Tyre was part of the Crusader state of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. At least one archbishop of Tyre was English, so the vernacular of Tyr is an appropriate 12th century English form of the attested locative phrase. Tir is a reasonable interpolation of the attested forms TyrTire, and Tyre, all found in the Middle English Dictionary. Therefore, we have changed the byname to of Tir, which is identical in sound and closer to appearance to the submitted form, in order to register this name.

Þorsteinn Hroðbjartsson. Name.

 

Tighearnán Blackwater. Name change from Tighearain Blackwater and badge. Azure, a talbot’s head erased ermine and a bordure counter-compony gules and argent.

Blackwater is grandfathered to the submitter.

The submitter’s previous name, Tighearain Blackwater, is released.

Vivien de Valois. Name.

The submitter requested authenticity for 15th century French. Both the given name and byname are dated to 1421, so this name meets the submitter’s request.

Wynflæd æt Hamtunscire. Name.

Submitted as Wynflaeaet Hamtunscir, the given name was changed to Wynflæd to match the documentation that could be found.

The correct form of the locative byname is æt Hamtunscire, using the dative form of the place name instead of the nominative (base) form. We have made these changes in order to register this name.

 

EAST returns 

Dragonship Haven, Barony of. Order name Order of Freya’s Cup.

In 2013 we ruled:

In August of 2005, the use of orders named after pagan deities and “saints” was allowed but ruled a step from period practice. Under SENA, there are no steps from period practice for names. Given that order names were derived from classical references (like the Golden Fleece) and from the names of saints, we will continue to allow order names to use the names of pagan gods and other figures that would have been venerated in those places that had order names. [East Kingdom, Order of Artemis, June 2013, A-East]

NPN1Cd1 of SENA states:

The name phrase must be shown to be a form by which the entity was known in that time and place. Generally this means finding it in the literature of that time (so a Renaissance Italian Bible, or an English publication of an Arthurian romance). In the case of a saint’s name, evidence for their veneration through the naming of churches is generally sufficient. Only the form of the name used in that culture is permitted under this allowance.

For example, the Greek mythological object known in English as the Golden Fleece was known to the medieval French as the Toison d’Or. It is Toison d’Or that was borrowed for the name of the period Burgundian order. Similarly, the saint known in her lifetime as Æhelthryth was venerated by late period English people as AudreyAudrey is the form allowed in late period English context to create a name like the College of Saint Audrey.

By long precedent, we do not allow the creation of lingua Anglica forms of given names. We have to document the name Freya, and cannot register the form Freya’s Cup because it uses a modern apostrophe. In addition, NPN1C2 of SENA states that the substantive element is a name phrase; the entire phrase must be either in a period form or a lingua Anglica form, but not a mixture of the two. Therefore, we need to document Freyas as a period genitive (possessive) form for the same time and place as the period English term Cup. Unfortunately, we could not find evidence that the spelling Freya was known in England at a time when order names were used there. Without this documentation, we cannot register Order of Freyas Cup.

Cup was not documented as a period form. This spelling is found in the MED, s.v. cuppe, dated to around 1425.

Upon resubmission, the submitter might like to know that the mythological Freya is found in Stephani Johannis Stephanii, Notae uberiores in Historiam Danicam Saxonis Grammatici (a Latin edition of Gesta Danorum from 1645), in earlier Latin translations of Gesta Danorum, and in various adaptations of the Gesta Danorum published in France in the 16th century. Therefore, Order of Freya could be registered as a Danish or French order name. English forms of the goddess’ name are documented in the late 13th to mid-15th centuries in the Middle English Dictionary: Freafriefrye, andffre. Something like Order of Freas Cup would also be registerable as an English order name. We are returning this order name so that the barony can consider its options.

 

EAST pends 

Esa Gray. Name.

The question was raised whether this name presumes upon that of 19th century botanist Asa Gray, one of Charles Darwin’s collaborators and founder of Harvard’s department of botany.

PN4D1 of SENA states:

Individuals whose names are recognized by a significant number of people in the Society without having to look them up in a reference are generally important enough to protect. Individuals recognized only by specialists in a subject are unlikely to be important enough to protect. Individuals who are only recognized with the assistance of reference books are unlikely to be important enough to protect.

Individuals whose work and/or life are still influential today are generally important enough to protect. Those whose work significantly shaped the course of world history, science, or the arts are generally important enough to protect. This is generally measured by examining measures like the length of encyclopedia articles about the person and his/her work, numbers of search engine hits for the individual, and the like.

We are pending the name to allow commenters to discuss just how prominent an individual needs to be to have “significantly shaped the course of world history, science, or the arts”, given that the names of many such individuals may only be known to specialists.

On the one hand for the present submission, Asa Grey’s name is largely known only by specialists. On the other, Asa Gray’s work clearly “shaped the course of world science”. In particular, Gray authored or co-authored the first editions of Gray’s Manual, still the standard text on North American plants. He also formed one of the first global networks of naturalists, was a founding member of the National Academy of Sciences, and arranged for Darwin’s On the Origin of Species to be published in the United States. He also defended the highly controversial theory of evolution and attempted to reconcile it with the prevailing theological teachings in a series of essays entitled Darwiniana. He is widely considered the most important American botanist of the 19th century.

If Asa Gray is important enough to protect, the present submission will be returned for presumption, as the two names can be identical in sound.

This name does not conflict with the registered name Aislinn Grey. One syllable has been substantially changed in sound and appearance under PN3C2 of SENA.

This name also does not conflict with the registered name Emma Grey. Both syllables of the given name have been changed in sound in appearance, so this name is clear under PN3C1 of SENA.

This was item 12 on the East letter of February 29, 2016.